Life Lessons, A Three Step Process

Something I wrote back in 2004 that still applies today for so many.

I have come to the conclusion that no matter what you want out of life there is a three step process.

The first step is to make a decision. You need to decide if you want to lose weight, stop smoking, save money, find a compatible mate, spend more time with your children, start a business, volunteer… you get the idea. Whatever it is you want to do, the first step is to decide and I mean really decide that you want to do it. Just talking it to death is not making a decision, making the effort and moving forward after making the decision is. So first, write down the decision you have made.

The next step is the big one, the big “C” and that is to make a commitment to your decision. The commitment is the stumbling point for so many. They talk and talk about the decisions, I’m going to lose weight, I am going to start exercising daily, I am going to stop smoking, etc.

A commitment means taking the steps to fulfill the decision you made. Making a plan to move forward. If your decision is to spend more time with your children, decide what days and time you will spend with them and make up a list of the things you could do with them. Or if you decide to volunteer, make a list of your interests, and then match that to a organization that needs volunteers.

If you have decided to start a business then make a plan on how you want to proceed. If you have decided to save money, you need to make a concentrated effort and a commitment to do so.

The commitment is how you are going to implement the decision and you must stick to your commitment or you are back in the decision stage and that is a “no man’s land”.

Okay, you made a decision, and have committed yourself to that decision, now the last step is to Succeed. Don’t think you are done. As a former smoker I know that you have to still commit yourself every day so you can continue to succeed. Same goes for those of us trying to keep weight off, and probably the best known continual effort is that of the alcoholic.Think of AA and the ongoing process.

So, make your decision, commit to it, and you will succeed, provided you continue to commit to your decision.

Wishing you the best in whatever decision you make!

The Angry and Sometimes Grumpy Children of the 1950’s

Please note:I wrote this year back in 2002, so now many of us, myself included are retired, but all of us are still not happy about many of the things going on today.

A bunch of us in our late 40’s and early 50’s got together the other night, and after the evening was over I started thinking that many of us born in the 1950’s are in a crisis stage. People can’t understand why we are so angry and grumpy sometimes. This article discusses some of the issues we have with society today and might enlighten others (the younger set) as to why we seem so disillusioned, and out of sorts at times.

The consensus of the group was “is this all there is.” We’ve been working since our teens. A car costs more today than what our parents bought a house for. We work and work and still don’t have enough. Food costs have risen astronomically, along with utility costs, insurance costs, and housing costs.

We started laughing at one point and said we sound like our grandparents. However, it is a very sad commentary that what took place for our grandparents over numerous decades, has only taken 20 to 30 years to occur for us. The real scary thing is that salaries for many jobs have not changed over that twenty year period, while our expenses have skyrocketed, and increased one hundred fold.

We all became nostalgic when we talked about the things we used to do to relax. How so many of those things are gone, or we can’t afford to do them any longer. Our kids tell us we don’t have a clue about school, sex, music, or what’s going on in the world. Again, the laughter abounded with the music issues, but became very serious when we talked about the scary things kids do today, that we wouldn’t even have thought of when we were growing up. Killing teachers, and other students never entered our minds. We had respect for our teachers and those in charge.

The next thing we ranted about was our health. For some of us, the ravages of time have taken place… eyesight problems, arthritis problems, blood pressure problems, “the barnacles of life”. The discussion we had on the cost of health care was a lively and volatile one to say the least. Many of us who have had major illness problems also went ballistic with regards to the social security system, the disability system and Medicare system. The majority of us have worked since our teenage years. We were incredulous when it took over a year to get money from the social security system, especially when we see people playing the system who don’t deserve it.

All of us are still working. The majority of our group are either self-employed or independent contractors. Many of us run home-based businesses. While we are still disheartened with the rise in costs, at least our work environment is a happy one, and one we feel in control of. For those in our group still working in corporate America, that’s just an additional concern and stress for them. Is their job safe? Will they be downsized? Laid off? We went back and forth on the work issue and found that while running your own business is a risk, we have a lot more control over our destiny than if we worked for someone else, and hence, a lot less stress. Plus we can’t fire ourselves.

We all wondered where it will end. So many of us thought we would be retired by now, or at least contemplating it within the next ten to fifteen years. However, with all the medical advances and hundred-fold costs of so many things, that is not an option. Retirement is no longer something people do automatically between 55 and 65. Today, the retirement age is in the 70’s.

For many of us, the thought of another twenty or more years of working is a depressing one, in addition to making us very angry and grumpy to say the least.

Hopefully this article will provide some insight to those who wonder why the over 50 generation is so angry and grumpy at times.

25 Life Lessons My Mother Taught Me

1. My mother taught me TO APPRECIATE A JOB WELL DONE . “If you’re going to kill each other, do it outside. I just finished cleaning.”

2. My mother taught me RELIGION. “You better pray that will come out of the carpet.”

3. My mother taught me about TIME TRAVEL. “If you don’t straighten up, I’m going to knock you into the middle of next week!”

4. My mother taught me LOGIC. ” Because I said so, that’s why.”

5. My mother taught me MORE LOGIC. ” If you fall out of that swing and break your neck, you’re not going to the store with me.”

6. My mother taught me FORESIGHT. “Make sure you wear clean underwear, in case you’re in an accident.”

7. My mother taught me IRONY. “Keep crying, and I’ll give you something to cry about.”

8. My mother taught me about the science of OSMOSIS. “Shut your mouth and eat your supper.”

9. My mother taught me about CONTORTIONISM. “Will you look at that dirt on the back of your neck!”

10. My mother taught me about STAMINA . “You’ll sit there until all that spinach is gone.”

11. My mother taught me about WEATHER. “This room of yours looks as if a tornado went through it.”

12. My mother taught me about HYPOCRISY. “If I told you once, I’ve told you a million times. Don’t exaggerate!”

13. My mother taught me the CIRCLE OF LIFE. “I brought you into this world, and I can take you out.”

14. My mother taught me about BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION. “Stop acting like your father!”

15. My mother taught me about ENVY . “There are millions of less fortunate children in this world who don’t have wonderful parents like you do.”

16. My mother taught me about ANTICIPATION. “Just wait until we get home.”

17. My mother taught me about RECEIVING . “You are going to get it when you get home!”

18. My mother taught me MEDICAL SCIENCE. “If you don’t stop crossing your eyes, they are going to freeze that way.”

19. My mother taught me ESP. “Put your sweater on; don’t you think I know when you are cold?”

20. My mother taught me HUMOR. “When that lawn mower cuts off your toes, don’t come running to me.”

21. My mother taught me HOW TO BECOME AN ADULT . “If you don “t eat your vegetables, you’ll never grow up.”

22. My mother taught me GENETICS. “You’re just like your father.”

23. My mother taught me about my ROOTS. “Shut that door behind you. Do you think you were born in a barn?”

24. My mother taught me WISDOM. “When you get to be my age, you’ll understand.”

25. And my favorite: My mother taught me about JUSTICE. “One day you’ll have kids, and I hope they turn out just like you.

 

Original Author is unknown

Memories From A Friend And Older Than Dirt Quiz

Someone asked the other day, “What was your favorite fast food when you were growing up?” “We didn’t have fast food when I was growing up,” I informed him. “All the food was slow.” “C’mon, seriously. Where did you eat?” “It was a place called “at home”, I explained.” “Mom cooked every day and when Dad got home from work, we sat down together at the dining room table, and if I didn’t like what she put on my plate I was allowed to sit there until I did like it.”

By this time, the kid was laughing so hard I was afraid he was going to suffer serious internal damage, so I didn’t tell him the part about how I had to have permission to leave the table.

But here are some other things I would have told him about my childhood if I figured his system could have handled it:

Some parents NEVER owned their own house, wore Levis , set foot on a golf course, traveled out of the country or had a credit card.

In their later years they had something called a revolving charge card. The card was good only at Sears Roebuck. Or maybe it was Sears & Roebuck. Either way, there is no Roebuck anymore. Maybe he died.

My parents never drove me to soccer practice. This was mostly because we never had heard of soccer.

I had a bicycle that weighed probably 50 pounds, and only had one speed, (slow).

We didn’t have a television in our house until I was 10. It was, of course, black and white, and the station went off the air at midnight, after playing the national anthem and a poem about God; it came back on the air at about 6 a.m. and there was usually a locally produced news and farm show on, featuring local people.

I was 9 before I tasted my first pizza, it was called “pizza pie.” When I bit into it, I burned the roof of my mouth and the cheese slid off, swung down, plastered itself against my chin and burned that, too. It’s still the best pizza I ever had.

I never had a telephone in my room. The only phone in the house was in the living room and it was on a party line. Before you could dial, you had to listen and make sure some people you didn’t know weren’t already using the line.

Pizzas were not delivered to our home. But milk was.

All newspapers were delivered by boys and all boys delivered newspapers –my brother delivered a newspaper, six days a week. It cost 7 cents a paper, of which he got to keep 2 cents. He had to get up at 6AM every morning. On Saturday, he had to collect the 42 cents from his customers. His favorite customers were the ones who gave him 50 cents and told him to keep the change. His least favorite customers were the ones who seemed to never be home on collection day.

Movie stars kissed with their mouths shut. At least, they did in the movies. There were no movie ratings because all movies were responsibly produced for everyone to enjoy viewing, without profanity or violence or most anything offensive.

If you grew up in a generation before there was fast food, you may want to share some of these memories with your children or grandchildren. Just don’t blame me if they bust a gut laughing.

Growing up isn’t what it used to be, is it?

Memories From a Friend

My Dad is cleaning out my grandmother’s house (she died in December) and he brought me an old Royal Crown Cola bottle. In the bottle top was a stopper with a bunch of holes in it… I knew immediately what it was, but my daughter had no idea. She thought they had tried to make it a salt shaker or something I knew it as the bottle that sat on the end of the ironing board to ‘sprinkle’ clothes with because we didn’t have steam irons.

Man, I am old.

How many do you remember?

Head lights dimmer switches on the floor.
Ignition switches on the dashboard.
Heaters mounted on the inside of the fire wall.
Real ice boxes.
Pant leg clips for bicycles without chain guards.
Soldering irons you heat on a gas burner.
Using hand signals for cars without turn signals

Older Than Dirt Quiz:

Count all the ones that you remember NOT the ones you were told about.

Ratings are at the bottom

1. Blackjack chewing gum & Teaberry also (my favs)
2. Wax Coke-shaped bottles with colored sugar water
3. Candy cigarettes
4. Soda pop machines that dispensed glass bottles
5. Coffee shops or diners with tableside juke boxes
6. Home milk delivery in glass bottles with cardboard stoppers
7. Party lines on the telephone
8. Newsreels before the movie
9. P.F. Flyers
10. Butch wax
11. TV test patterns that came on at night after the last show and were there until TV shows started again in the morning. (there were only 3 channels [if you were fortunate])
12. Peashooters
13. Howdy Doody
14. 45 RPM records
15. S& H green stamps
16. Hi-fi’s
17. Metal ice trays with lever
18. Mimeograph paper
19. Blue flashbulb
20. Packard’s
21. Roller skate keys
22. Cork popguns
23. Drive-ins
24. Studebakers
25. Wash tub wringers

Ratings

If you remembered 0-5 = You’re still young
If you remembered 6-10 = You are getting older
If you remembered 11-15 = Don’t tell your age,
If you remembered 16-25 = You’re older than dirt!

I remembered all 25, How many do you remember? Are you sitting there thinking “get real” or are you grinning and thinking those were the good old days?

Have a good day and keep smiling.

 

Original Author is unknown

Senior Citizens

Senior citizens are constantly being criticized for every conceivable deficiency of the modern world, real or imaginary. We know we take responsibility for all we have done and do not blame others. HOWEVER, upon reflection, we would like to point out that it was NOT the senior citizens who took: 

  • The melody out of music,
  • The pride out of appearance,
  • The courtesy out of driving,
  • The romance out of love,
  • The commitment out of marriage,
  • The responsibility out of parenthood,
  • The togetherness out of the family,
  • The learning out of education,
  • The service out of patriotism,
  • The Golden Rule from rulers,
  • The nativity scene out of cities,
  • The civility out of behavior,
  • The refinement out of language,
  • The dedication out of employment,
  • The prudence out of spending,
  • The ambition out of achievement or
  • God out of government and school.

And we certainly are NOT the ones who eliminated patience and tolerance from personal relationships and interactions with others!! 

And, we do understand the meaning of patriotism, and remember those who have fought and died for our country. 

Does anyone under the age of 50 know the lyrics to the Star Spangled Banner? What about the last verse of My Country ’tis of Thee? 

“Our father’s God to thee, Author of liberty, To Thee we sing. Long may our land be bright, With freedom’s Holy light. Protect us by Thy might, Great God our King.” 

Just look at the Seniors with tears in their eyes and pride in their hearts as they stand at attention with their hand over their hearts! 

YES, I’M A SENIOR CITIZEN! 

I’m the life of the party……even if it lasts until 8 p.m. I’m very good at opening childproof caps…. with a hammer. I’m awake many hours before my body allows me to get up. I’m smiling all the time because I can’t hear a thing you’re saying. I’m sure everything I can’t find is in a safe secure place, somewhere. I’m wrinkled, saggy, lumpy, and that’s just my left leg. I’m beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps. I’m a walking storeroom of facts….. I’ve just lost the key to the storeroom door.  

Yes, I’m a SENIOR CITIZEN and I think I am having the time of my life!

 

Original Author is unknown

Welcome to When Life Was Simpler

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A5_200-x-301_small-1956 A3_200-x-249_small-November-1951 We’re Sue & Chuck, Welcome to When Life Was Simpler.

Why not stick around and join us for some fun times, lively discussion of things past and present, remembrances of times past, our not so politically correct opinions and possibly even some commentary on the stupid things we see going on today. We can’t promise you’ll agree with all, some or even any of our posts, but we think we can promise you won’t be bored.

The blog will be evolving over the next few months as we shut down our other websites and add some of that material here and of course, post new items.

For more background on us visit our Who’s Behind The Curtain page.